Fresh Start

I deleted my old account in a fit of anger. I'm using today as a stepping stone. One day at a time...

50 years ago, America’s biggest employer was General Motors, where workers made the modern equivalent of $50 dollars an hour. Today, America’s biggest employer is Walmart, where the average wage is $8 dollars an hour. Which means you can share a room in a transient hotel with a drifter who cuts his toenails with a machete.

And Walmart released their annual report this month, and in it was the fact that most of what Walmart sells is food. And most of their customers need food stamps to pay for it. Meanwhile, Walmart’s owners are so absurdly rich that one of them, Alice Walton, spent over a billion dollars building an art museum in Bentonville, Arkansas, 500 miles away from the nearest person who ever would want to look at art.

And she said about it, “For years I’ve been thinking about what we can do as a family that can really make a difference.” How about giving your employees a raise, you deluded nitwit?

Take the case of Belle Knox. She’s the Duke University freshman who was recently outed as a porn star. But she doesn’t have the typical porn star biography… No, she’s a level-headed articulate 18-year-old majoring in women’s studies.

So people are saying, why the porn? Because Duke costs $61 grand a year! Since 1980, college tuition has increased 600% above the inflation rate. I’m surprised they’re not all doing porn. …

This is what the Paul Ryans of the world don’t understand — that this is not a country of lazy people and good people, so much as it is a country of rich people and desperate people.

Do you know how much Americans owe in student loans?
$1.3 trillion dollars.

We’re going to have to sell a lot of ass to pay that tab.

Bill Maher on the vanishing middle class (via kateoplis)

(Source: inothernews, via gentleman-monster)

We’re adults, but, like…adult cats. Someone should probably take care of us, but we can sort of make it on our own.

—my roommate, on the question “are we adults” (via disjunct)

(via vetschoolandhardcore)

ludicrouscupcake:

babblingbug:

(Bunnies and Sunshine)

Easter is coming up! And it’s a terrible time for pet store bunnies!

Rabbits are marketed as “easy”, short-lived, starter pets, especially during the Easter holidays, but that couldn’t be farther from the truth! A healthy, well cared for bunny can live just as long as the average cat or dog- 10-12 years!

What’s more, they have more complex needs than a cat or a dog. Rabbits are prey animals and do not behave or show affection in the same way as predators like cats and dogs; they don’t deal well with being outside-only animals; they can get sad if they’re on their own and don’t receive enough attention; and if they’re bought as a male and female couple, they can start reproducing from as early as 5-6 months of age, and they can carry multiple litters at the same time!

They have a specialised diet (NOT carrots!), need a specialised living area (unless you want all your things to get chewed up!), and they need specialised vets! Caring for them costs as much as caring for a dog!

They’re a big responsibility!

This Easter, Make Yours Chocolate!

BUNNY SAFETY SIGNAL BOOST BECAUSE BUNNIES ARE IMPORTANT

(via vetschoolandhardcore)

incestuous-elsanna:

heckyeahelsanna:

I NEED TO POINT SOMETHING OUT 
A lot of people have been complaining about how Elsa’s  ”recovery” at the end wasn’t believable - that after thirteen years of fear and depression, there’s no WAY she would be better just like that.
Of course, those people are right. Thirteen years of pain doesn’t disappear after a few moments of happiness.
But here’s the thing - Elsa didn’t just “recover”. She’s happy in this moment, and for good reason -  a huge weight has been lifted off her shoulders. She’s relieved to not have to hide, to be with her sister, etc.
However, this is just one scene. Everyone who has depression knows that no matter how depressed you are, there are still some happy (or at least smile worthy) moments. In addition, if you really look at her face, you will notice that the emotions being expressed aren’t just happiness. Elsa’s feeling a whole range of emotions here - nervousness, excitement, disbelief, etc. Not pure happiness.
The fact is, it won’t be a 100% happy ending for Elsa. Even after the movie, she’s still going to have a shitload to deal with. She’ll still suffer from depression, anxiety, etc - the difference is that now she can be open about it and receive help from her sister. She doesn’t have to hide it anymore. Of course, she’ll want to, but now that Anna knows the truth there’s no way she’ll let her.
So yes, Elsa was happy in the end. Is this unbelievable? No. Will she have a perfect happily ever after and never feel intense emotional pain again? Obviously not. She’s going to go through a lot, as anyone recovering from a mental illness does. The important thing is that she’s on the way to getting there, and this scene marks the beginning of her journey to happiness.

this is how depression works. sometimes there are good days, sometimes there are bad days. everyday is always grey, but sometimes with just a little less rain.

incestuous-elsanna:

heckyeahelsanna:

I NEED TO POINT SOMETHING OUT 

A lot of people have been complaining about how Elsa’s  ”recovery” at the end wasn’t believable - that after thirteen years of fear and depression, there’s no WAY she would be better just like that.

Of course, those people are right. Thirteen years of pain doesn’t disappear after a few moments of happiness.

But here’s the thing - Elsa didn’t just “recover”. She’s happy in this moment, and for good reason -  a huge weight has been lifted off her shoulders. She’s relieved to not have to hide, to be with her sister, etc.

However, this is just one scene. Everyone who has depression knows that no matter how depressed you are, there are still some happy (or at least smile worthy) moments. In addition, if you really look at her face, you will notice that the emotions being expressed aren’t just happiness. Elsa’s feeling a whole range of emotions here - nervousness, excitement, disbelief, etc. Not pure happiness.

The fact is, it won’t be a 100% happy ending for Elsa. Even after the movie, she’s still going to have a shitload to deal with. She’ll still suffer from depression, anxiety, etc - the difference is that now she can be open about it and receive help from her sister. She doesn’t have to hide it anymore. Of course, she’ll want to, but now that Anna knows the truth there’s no way she’ll let her.

So yes, Elsa was happy in the end. Is this unbelievable? No. Will she have a perfect happily ever after and never feel intense emotional pain again? Obviously not. She’s going to go through a lot, as anyone recovering from a mental illness does. The important thing is that she’s on the way to getting there, and this scene marks the beginning of her journey to happiness.

this is how depression works. sometimes there are good days, sometimes there are bad days. everyday is always grey, but sometimes with just a little less rain.

(via spaceprincess-nyssa)